Welcome to the Ontario Justice Education Network

New OJEN Classroom Resources!
  • A Foot in the Door: A Classroom Resource on Real Estate and Housing Law in Ontario - This 6-module resource, produced by the Lawyers’ Professional Indemnity Company (LAWPRO) and the Ontario Justice Education Network (OJEN), provides an introduction to real estate and housing law in Ontario, including the various considerations and processes involved in purchasing and renting a home. Students will develop their financial literacy and negotiation skills through interactive activities on budgeting, mortgages, and how to rent or purchase a residential property. 

  • Youth Agency and the Culture of Law - This resource, produced in partnership with the University of Toronto Faculties of Law and Social Work, Law in Action Within Schools (LAWS), and the South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario (SALCO), allows students to explore ideas about youth and agency in Canada’s legal culture, and their implications for reflecting on decisions to marry and emancipation. Through five written modules and a graphic novel, students will deepen their understanding of legal issues related to forced marriage, leaving home, age of majority, the minimum age of marriage, and guardianship. Legal concepts are introduced through stories, scenarios, legal cases, and discussion questions that have students examine these broad topics in Ontario and Canadian contexts.

  • Access to Justice Game - In any given 3 year period, nearly 12 million Canadians will experience at least one legal problem. Few will have the resources to solve them. The curriculum-linked Access to Justice game increases students' understanding of the challenges faced by individuals accessing the justice system to resolve a variety of common legal difficulties, from landlord tenant disputes to family law issues. OJEN/ROEJ offers the A2J game as part of Flip Your Wig For Justice campaign. Have fun! 

  • Legal Reasoning Tool: Guide to Canadian Legal Citation - Legal matters are one way in which society makes difficult decisions and these decisions can have important consequences for individuals and communities. Legal writing is a way of recording how these decisions were made, so that other people can understand them and even revisit and change them in the future. Citations allow others to find the sources that were used so they can consider them on their own and help to clarify which authors are putting forth which ideas or arguments. The information in this resource is based entirely on the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation, 7th ed (Toronto: Carswell, 2010). It addresses some of the most commonly-used rules in language that is accessible to secondary students.

  • Legal Reasoning Tool: How to Write a Case Brief - The ability to clearly, accurately and concisely describe a chain of events and show how arguments and ideas logically build upon one another is a skill that can help students in their studies, their future work and in everyday life. How to Write a Case Brief will support students’ development of this skill by providing a reference framework as they distill complex legal matters into a clear legal narrative. This tool comprises a professional template, accessible explanation and clear exemplars for producing sound legal writing.

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