About the Justice System

A Brief History of the Justice of the Peace Bench

The office of Justice of the Peace was transplanted from England to Canada in 1763 as a result of the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which decreed that the law of England, both civil and criminal, was to be imposed upon all the territory of what subsequently became Canada.

Access to Justice Game

In any given 3 year period, nearly 12 million Canadians will experience at least one legal problem.  Few will have the resources to solve them. The curriculum-linked Access to Justice game increases students' understanding of the challenges faced by individuals accessing the justice system to resolve a variety of common legal difficulties, from landlord tenant disputes to family law issues.  OJEN/ROEJ offers the A2J game as part of Flip Your Wig For Justice campaign. Have fun! 

An American Visitor to A Canadian Court

Despite this common history and despite the superficial similarity, there are differences between the judicial systems of the two nations. These differences may be reflected in the symbols displayed within the courtroom, the organization of the courts and the legal professions, the procedure of the court and the origin and nature of the laws being enforced.
 

Courtroom & Classroom Visits Lesson Plans

These lesson plans can be used prior to a courthouse visit or a classroom visit from a justice sector professional. Strategies are provided for introducing students to the structure of the justice system in Ontario, as well as tips on courtroom etiquette and interacting with justice sector professionals.

In Brief: Canadian Constitution

OJEN In Brief resources are designed to provide high school students with an introduction to basic legal concepts. Each resource includes a short lesson plan for the teacher; a 1-4 page plain language description of the legal topic; and activities that provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the topic.

In Brief: Careers in Justice

OJEN In Brief resources are designed to provide high school students with an introduction to basic legal concepts. Each resource includes a short lesson plan for the teacher; a plain language description of the legal topic; and activities that provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the topic.

In Brief: Common Law and Civil Law

OJEN In Brief resources are designed to provide high school students with an introduction to basic legal concepts. Each resource includes a short lesson plan for the teacher; a 1-4 page plain language description of the legal topic; and activities that provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the topic.

In Brief: Expert Evidence

OJEN In Brief resources are designed to provide high school students with an introduction to basic legal concepts. Each resource includes a short lesson plan for the teacher; a plain language description of the legal topic; and activities that provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the topic.

In Brief: Making A New Law

OJEN In Brief resources are designed to provide high school students with an introduction to basic legal concepts. Each resource includes a short lesson plan for the teacher; a 1-4 page plain language description of the legal topic; and activities that provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the topic.

In Brief: Restorative Justice in the Criminal Context

Restorative justice is based on the principle that criminal behaviour harms not only the victim(s) of crime, but also the community and the wrongdoer(s) as well. Restorative justice responds to crime by addressing the harm caused to victims, holding wrongdoers accountable for their actions, and restoring relationships with the community.

Syndicate content

Check out our Photo Galleries to see more photos from OJEN programs and events